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Submitted: 09 Nov 2021
Accepted: 09 Feb 2022
ePublished: 12 Feb 2022
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J Prev Epidemiol. 2022;7(2): e26162.
doi: 10.34172/jpe.2022.26162
  Abstract View: 153
  PDF Download: 29

Original Article

Knowledge, attitude and practice regarding antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance among the rural public in Mangaluru, India

Amit Khelgi 1* ORCID logo, Raghavendra Huchchannavar 1 ORCID logo, Milu Mary Mathew 1, Sathya Anandam 2 ORCID logo

1 Nitte (Deemed to be University) KS Hegde Medical Academy, Department of Microbiology, Mangalore, India
2 Department of Microbiology, Yenepoya Medical College, Mangalore, India
*Corresponding Author: Correspondence to: Amit Khelgi, Email: dramitsk14@gmail.com, , Email: dramitsk14@nitte.edu.in

Abstract

Introduction: India is a leading consumer of antibiotics; rational use of antibiotics is of prime importance.

Objectives: The majority of the population in India resides in rural areas; hence this study was conducted to capture their knowledge, attitude and practice regarding antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance.

Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey was conducted among 130 randomly selected general public of rural Mangaluru. Descriptive analysis and Pearson’s chi-square were employed in data analysis.

Results: Adequate knowledge was observed only in 18.5% of the participants. Around 30.8% of participants thought antibiotics killed all germs while 23.8% were of no opinion. Furthermore, 60.8% thought that antibiotics speed up recovery from flu. Only about 23% thought frequent use of antibiotics would make the bacteria stronger and ineffective in the future. A minimal of 16.2% knew that antibiotic resistance is a global problem. About 52.3% preferred to take an antibiotic whenever they had the flu. However, 47% wanted to take it after doctors’ consultation. The study showed that compliance to complete the course was better when a doctor explained the proper use of the prescribed antibiotic. Additionally 31.5% opted for self-medication using the previous prescription and 21.5% took the antibiotics suggested by anyone other than the doctor.

Conclusion: The study findings help re-evaluate the current public awareness activity and provide insight into some of the areas required to be focused on and aid the adequate legislative changes for a better outcome.


Citation: Khelgi A, Huchchannavar R, Mathew MM, Anandam S. Knowledge, attitude and practice regarding antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance among the rural public in Mangaluru, India. J Prev Epidemiol. 2022;7(2):e26162. doi: 10.34172/ jpe.2022.26162.
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